What is the best IP camera software?

IP Camera Software can keep eye on your home, office, parking area, or anywhere you have an IP camera.
View video from multiple cameras simultaneously. What ip camera software is the best?
Traditional video surveillance systems require expensive infrastructures with capabilities to process and store video recordings. New video surveillance systems based on P2P collects multimedia streams generated by surveillance cameras, optimizes their transmissions with SVC according to network condition and stores them in a cloud storage system in an efficient and secure way.

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IP cameras also have additional features that analog cameras don't offer, such as video analytics, which allow for mobile notifications and automatic recording if there is movement within the camera's field of vision. This is particularly useful for times when your business is closed and you want to know if someone is moving around inside the premises. You can configure the system to flag events like this and send notifications directly to your smartphone, along with recorded footage of the event. Some systems also offer a direct, one-touch connection to local law enforcement.

Key Functions of Video Surveillance
Installation of CCTV / IP cameras helps not only to prevent crimes due to visual control but also to charge criminals using the information recorded by video camera.

· Remote control from video cameras through Internet on any personal device (tablet, smart phone, desktop).
· Safety of people / property in office premises, at home or in a country house.
· Prevent thefts and damage of goods .

Producers of Video Surveillance Systems
FLIR, Bosch, Gazer, Dahua, Hikvision, Web Camera Pro, SuperVision, GeoVision, Axis, Samsung, HyperVision, Avigilon, Panasonic, SmartVision.

Home Security Cameras and Video Surveillance Equipment
There are two types of cameras used for surveillance - analog and IP (internet protocol), which are digital cameras.

Analog cameras: These are usually lower resolution than the more modern IP technology, and require cable connections to a DVR to record and store footage, plus wired connections for power. With the DVR, the footage can be viewed on a monitor in real time or a router and modem can be connected to transmit the footage. These cameras cost less than digital cameras, but because their field of vision is smaller, more cameras may be needed. There are more design options for analog cameras, so you may find the right camera for your needs at a lower cost than digital. You also won't lose the network bandwidth that digital cameras take up.

Digital cameras: IP cameras are higher resolution, which generates clearer images but, as we said, use more bandwidth to transmit and require more storage space. Cameras connect to a network video recorder (NVR) via a PoE (Power over Ethernet) switch, which has ports for many cameras and then uses just one cable to connect to the NVR and power source. This reduces the number of cables needed but can put a drain on your network bandwidth.

There is no limitation to where cameras can be placed in relation to the NVR, and wireless network access enables remote viewing of footage. Also, the digital feed can be encrypted. Wi-Fi cameras do, however, raise the concern of potential hacking, so it is important to understand the security features of your cameras.